Course Catalog

High

Math

Geometry Credit Recovery

Note: Credit Recovery courses are credit bearing courses with specific content requirements defined by the Florida Standards. Students enrolled in a Credit Recovery course must have previously attempted the corresponding course (and/or End-of-Course assessment) since the course requirements for the Credit Recovery course are exactly the same as the previously attempted corresponding course. Credit Recovery courses should ONLY be used for credit recovery, grade forgiveness, or remediation for students needing to prepare for an End-of-Course assessment retake. NOTE: This course does not meet NCAA requirements.

Informal Geometry

Course Description: The fundamental purpose of the course in Informal Geometry is to extend students' geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships. Important differences exist between this Geometry course and the historical approach taken in Geometry classes. For example, transformations are emphasized early in this course. Close attention should be paid to the introductory content for the Geometry conceptual category found in the high school standards. The Standards for Mathematical Practice apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. The critical areas, organized into five units are as follows.

Liberal Arts Math 1

Course Description: Liberal Arts Mathematics is a course designed to strengthen the mathematical skills required for end of course exams and college entrance exams. Units of study will include solving and graphing equations, inequalities and systems of equations, properties of polynomials and exponents, introduction to geometry, similarity, three dimensional measurements and statistics. This course may be taken in addition to Algebra 1 but not offered as a blocked class. *This course does not meet NCAA requirements.

Liberal Arts Math 2

Course Description: Liberal Arts Mathematics is a course designed to strengthen the mathematical skills required for end of course exams and college entrance exams. Units of study will include solving and graphing equations, inequalities and systems of equations, properties of polynomials and exponents, introduction to geometry, similarity, three dimensional measurements and statistics.

Math College Readiness

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to enhance and continue the study of mathematics after Algebra 1, Algebra 2, and Geometry and to prepare students for college-level studies. The content will include graphing linear functions, quadratic functions, absolute value functions, radical functions and rational functions. Students will also be expected to solve equations containing these types of functions as well as performing operations on expressions and simplifying. Other topics will include inequalities, factoring polynomials, applied problems, and systems of equations.

Pre-Calculus Honors

Course Description: This course is designed to strengthen and extend the student’s knowledge of algebraic and trigonometric concepts and to prepare the student for calculus. The content will include mathematical induction, symbolic logic, Boolean and matrix algebra, probability and statistics, elementary functions and limits. Calculators and computers will serve as instructional tools in concept development.

Electives

Intensive Reading

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to provide instruction that enables students to accelerate the development of reading and writing skills and to strengthen those skills so they are able to successfully read and write grade level text independently. Instruction emphasizes reading comprehension, writing fluency, and vocabulary study through the use of a variety of literary and informational texts encompassing a broad range of text structures, genres, and levels of complexity. Texts used for instruction focus on a wide range of topics, including content-area information, in order to support students in meeting the knowledge demands of increasingly complex text. Students enrolled in the course will engage in interactive text-based discussion, question generation, and research opportunities. They will write in response to reading and cite evidence when answering text dependent questions orally and in writing. The course provides extensive opportunities for students to collaborate with their peers. Scaffolding is provided as necessary as students engage in reading and writing increasingly complex text and is removed as the reading and writing abilities of students improve over time.

The Intensive courses have been designed for the teacher to select and teach only the appropriate standards corresponding to a student's grade level and/or instructional needs.

Introduction to Drama – (Art Elective)

Course Description: Students explore various performance, technical, and administrative aspects of theatre. Students learn about basic characterization through physical activity, reading selected theatre literature, reading and writing theatrical reviews, and analysis of such tools as scripts, costuming, and theatrical makeup. Public performances may serve as a resource for specific instructional goals. Students may be expected to attend one or more performances outside the school day to support, extend, and assess learning in the classroom.

Marketing Foundations

Outdoor Education

Major Concepts/Content:

  • Analyze long-term benefits of regularly participating in physical activity.
  • Apply appropriate technology and analyze data to evaluate, monitor and/or improve performance.
  • Analyze and evaluate the risks, safety procedures, rules and equipment associated with specific course activities.
  • Identify a variety of activities that promote effective stress management.
  • Identify the in-school opportunities for participation in a variety of physical activities.
  • Identify risks and safety factors that may affect physical activity throughout life.
  • Demonstrate competency in two or more extreme sports activities.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in a variety of outdoor pursuit activities.
  • Apply strategies and tactics in a variety of outdoor pursuits.
  • Practice complex motor activities in order to improve performance.
  • Demonstrate use of the mechanical principles as they apply to specific course activities.
  • Select proper equipment and apply all appropriate safety procedures necessary for participation.
  • Describe ways to act independently of peer pressure during physical activities.
  • Demonstrate appropriate etiquette, care of equipment, respect for facilities and safe behaviors while participating in a variety of physical activities.
  • Discuss opportunities for participation in a variety of physical activities outside of the school setting that contribute to personal enjoyment and the attainment or maintenance of a healthy lifestyle.
  • Analyze the roles of games, sports and/or physical activities in other cultures.
  • English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • Analyze decisions and strategies using probability concepts (e.g., product testing, medical testing, pulling a hockey goalie at the end of a game).
     

Peer Counseling 1

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop basic knowledge and skills in communication, meeting human needs, and conflict resolution.

The content should include the following:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the functions and responsibilities of peer facilitators (e.g., listening, confidentiality, team building, conflict resolution, intervention).
  • Demonstrate awareness of varied behavioral responses to situational, environmental, and chemical elements; and the impact of subsequent decision-making on self and others.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of basic human needs (e.g., food, clothing, shelter, recognition, development, security, identity) and the ways in which they can be met while developing group cohesion.
  • Demonstrate use of basic facilitative communication skills (e.g., listening, questioning, feedback, paraphrasing, nonverbal communication, nonjudgmental response).
  • Identify own feelings and needs and communicate them in a positive way.
  • Demonstrate awareness of leadership styles (e.g., authoritarian, democratic, permissive).
  • Demonstrate awareness of methods for dealing with conflict (e.g., communication, assertion, avoidance, aggression) and steps to resolution (i.e., set rules, gather perspectives, identify needs and goals, create and evaluate options, and generate agreement)
  • Make inferences and justify conclusions from sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies.

Peer Counseling 2

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop intermediate-level knowledge and skills in communication, personal and group dynamics, and conflict resolution.

The content should include the following:

  • Demonstrate understanding of the functions and responsibilities of peer facilitators (listening, team building, confidentiality, conflict resolution, and intervention).
  • Demonstrate knowledge of varied behavioral responses to situational, environmental, and chemical elements; and the impact of subsequent decision-making on self and others.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the impact of self-knowledge and interpersonal skills on relationships with peers and family.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the positive and negative impacts of peer pressure on oneself and on relationships with peers and family.
  • Demonstrate use of intermediate-level facilitative communication skills (listening, questioning, feedback, paraphrasing, nonverbal communication, nonjudgmental response).
  • Make inferences and justify conclusions from sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies.

Personal Financial Literacy

Course Description: This grade 9-12 course consists of the following content area and literacy strands: Economics, Financial Literacy, Mathematics, Languages Arts for Literacy in History/Social Studies and Speaking and Listening. Basic economic concepts of scarcity, choice, opportunity cost, and cost/benefit analysis are interwoven throughout the standards and objectives. Emphasis will be placed on economic decision-making and real-life applications using real data.

The primary content for the course pertains to the study of learning the ideas, concepts, knowledge and skills that will enable students to implement beneficial personal decision-making choices; to become wise, successful, and knowledgeable consumers, savers, investors, users of credit and money managers; and to be participating members of a global workforce and society.

Content should include, but not be limited to:

  • cost/Benefit analysis of economic decisions
  • earning an income
  • understanding state and federal taxes
  • utilizing banking and financial services
  • balancing a checkbook and managing a bank account
  • savings, investment and planning for retirement
  • understanding loans and borrowing money, including predatory lending and payday loans
  • understanding interest, credit card debt and online commerce
  • how to prevent identify fraud and theft
  • rights and responsibilities of renting or buying a home
  • understanding and planning for major financial purchases
  • understanding the costs and benefits of insurance
  • understanding the financial impact and consequence of gambling
  • avoiding and filing bankruptcy
  • reducing tax liability.

Personal Fitness

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and values they need to become healthy and physically active for a lifetime. This course addresses both the health and skill-related components of physical fitness which are critical for students' success.

Psychology 1

Psychology 1 - Through the study of psychology, students acquire an understanding of and an appreciation for human behavior, behavior interaction and the progressive development of individuals. The content examined in this first introductory course includes major theories and orientations of psychology, psychological methodology, memory and cognition, human growth and development, personality, abnormal behavior, psychological therapies, stress/coping strategies, and mental health.

Psychology 2

Psychology 2 - Through the study of psychology, students acquire an understanding of and an appreciation for human behavior, behavior interaction and the progressive development of individuals. The content examined in this second introductory course includes statistical research, psychobiology, motivation and emotion, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, psychological testing, and social psychology.

Reading College Success

Course Description: This course is targeted for students who are not "college-ready" in reading. This course incorporates reading and analysis of informational selections to develop critical reading skills necessary for success in college courses. This course prepares students for successful completion of Florida college English language arts courses requiring extensive grade-level reading. The benchmarks reflect the Florida College Competencies necessary for entry-level college courses.

Sociology

Sociology - Through the study of sociology, students acquire an understanding of group interaction and its impact on individuals in order that they may have a greater awareness of the beliefs, values and behavior patterns of others. In an increasingly interdependent world, students need to recognize how group behavior affects both the individual and society.

Science

Marine Science

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the marine environment. The content includes the nature of science, the origins of the oceans, the chemical and physical structure of the marine environment, ecology of the various sea zones, marine communities, and the interrelationship between man and the ocean. Laboratory investigations will include the use of the scientific process, measurement, laboratory apparatus and safety procedures. Preserved specimens may be a part of this course.

Physics 1 and Physics 1 Honors

Course Description: This course provides a foundation of the concepts, theories and laws governing the interaction of matter, energy and the forces of nature. The content includes kinematics, dynamics, energy, work and power, heat and thermodynamics, waves, light, electricity, magnetism, nuclear physics, and sound. Laboratory investigations of selected topics include the use of the scientific process, measurement, laboratory apparatus, and safety.