Course Catalog

High

Electives

AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY – Advanced Placement

Course Description: Introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth's surface.

AP Spanish Language and Culture

Course Description: AP Spanish Language and Culture is equivalent to an intermediate level college course in Spanish. Students cultivate their understanding of Spanish language and culture by applying interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication in real-life situations as they explore concepts related to family and communities, personal and public identities, beauty and aesthetics, science and technology, contemporary life, and global challenges.

Career Research and Decision Making

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to develop career planning competencies, enabling students to make informed career choices and develop the skills needed to successfully plan and apply for college or a job.

Creative Writing 1

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop and use grade 9-10 writing and language skills for creative expression in a variety of literary forms. Studying and modeling a variety of genres will be emphasized at this level of creative writing.

Digital Information Technology – (Arts Elective)

Course Description: This course is designed to provide a basic overview of current business and information systems and trends, and to introduce students to fundamental skills required for today's business and academic environments. Emphasis is placed on developing fundamental computer skills.

Drivers Education

Major concepts/content: The purpose of this classroom course is to introduce students to the highway transportation system and to teach strategies that will develop driving knowledge related to today's and tomorrow's motorized society. It will also provide an in-depth study of the scope and nature of accident problems and their solutions. The content should include, but not be limited to, the following:

  • vehicle control and traffic procedures
  • defensive driving strategies
  • pertinent laws and their application to driving
  • energy efficient and safe enjoyable vehicle ownership
  • physical and mental factors
  • legal and moral obligations
  • knowledge of motorcycle operations and interactions in the system
  • planning for safe travel to include map studies
  • effects of alcohol and other drugs on driving performance

Fitness Lifestyle Design

Major Concepts/Content:

  • Evaluate the effectiveness of specific warm-up and cool-down activities.
  • Analyze long-term benefits of regularly participating in physical activity.
  • Document food intake, calories consumed and energy expended through physical activity and analyze the results.
  • Apply appropriate technology and analyze data to evaluate, monitor and/or improve performance.
  • Analyze the mechanical principles as they apply to specific course activities.
  • Analyze and evaluate the risks, safety procedures, rules and equipment associated with specific course activities.
  • Evaluate skill patterns of self and/or partner by detecting and correcting mechanical errors.
  • Compare and contrast how movement skills from one physical activity can be transferred and used in other physical activities.
  • Participate in a variety of physical activities to meet the recommended number of minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity beyond physical education on five or more days of the week.
  • Identify a variety of activities that promote effective stress management.
  • Identify the in-school opportunities for participation in a variety of physical activities.
  • Identify the community opportunities for participation in a variety of physical activities.
  • Identify risks and safety factors that may affect physical activity throughout life.
  • Evaluate how to make changes in an individual wellness plan as lifestyle changes occur.
  • Apply strategies for self improvement based on individual strengths and needs.
  • Perform a student-designed cardiorespiratory enhancing workout.
  • Utilize technology to assess, enhance and maintain health and skill-related fitness levels.
  • Select and apply sport/activity specific warm-up and cool-down techniques.
  • Apply the principles of training and conditioning to accommodate individual needs and strengths.
  • Demonstrate use of the mechanical principles as they apply to specific course activities.
  • Select proper equipment and apply all appropriate safety procedures necessary for participation.
  • Develop strategies for including persons of diverse backgrounds and abilities while participating in a variety of physical activities.
  • Maintain appropriate personal, social and ethical behavior while participating in a variety of physical activities.
  • Demonstrate appropriate etiquette, care of equipment, respect for facilities and safe behaviors while participating in a variety of physical activities.
  • Analyze physical activities from which benefits can be derived.
  • Analyze the roles of games, sports and/or physical activities in other cultures.
  • Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 11–12 texts and topics.
  • Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9–10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • Use statistics appropriate to the shape of the data distribution to compare center (median, mean) and spread (interquartile range, standard deviation) of two or more different data sets. 
  • Analyze decisions and strategies using probability concepts (e.g., product testing, medical testing, pulling a hockey goalie at the end of a game). 
     

Science

Biology 1 and Biology 1 Honors

Course Description: This course provides students with exploratory activities, laboratory experiences and real-life applications in the biological sciences. The content includes the following concepts: nature of science, matter, energy, chemical processes of life, reproduction and communication of cells, basic study of genetics, organization, classification and taxonomy, structure, reproduction and function of plants, animals, and microorganisms, interdependence of living things, adaptations, and the impact of technology on society. Preserved animal studies may be a part of this course. All students are required to pass Biology 1. The Biology End Of Course Exam will account for 30% of the final grade. Students working towards the Scholar Designation must pass the Biology EOC.

Biology Credit Recovery

Note: Credit Recovery courses are credit bearing courses with specific content requirements defined by the Florida Standards. Students enrolled in a Credit Recovery course must have previously attempted the corresponding course (and/or End-of-Course assessment) since the course requirements for the Credit Recovery course are exactly the same as the previously attempted corresponding course. Credit Recovery courses should ONLY be used for credit recovery, grade forgiveness, or remediation for students needing to prepare for an End-of-Course assessment retake. NOTE: This course does not meet NCAA requirements.

Chemistry 1 and Chemistry 1 Honors

Course Description: This course involves the study of the composition, properties, and changes associated with matter. The content includes the classification and structure of matter, atomic theory, periodic table, bonding, chemical formulas, chemical reactions and balanced equations, behavior of gases, and physical changes. Selected laboratory investigations include the use of the scientific process, measurement, laboratory apparatus, and safety.

Earth Space Science and Earth Space Science Honors

Course Description: This course provides a study of the interaction and organization of matter and energy in the solar system and the universe, and how this affects life on Earth. The content includes theories for the formation of the universe and solar system, formation of rocks, landforms, plate tectonics, fresh water and marine systems, meteorology, geologic time and renewable/non-renewable energy sources. Selected laboratory investigations include the use of scientific process, measurement, laboratory apparatus, and safety and are an integral part of this course.

Environmental Science

Course Description: This course provides a study of man's interaction with the environment. The content includes forms of pollution, conservation, environmental planning and policy, public land usages, population dynamics, and major forms of energy. Laboratory investigations include the use of the scientific process, measurement, laboratory apparatus, and safety.

Forensic Science 1

Course Description: Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA, 2007).

Forensic Science 2

Course Description: Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA, 2007).

Math

Calculus Honors

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor. Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted. Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

Geometry and Geometry Honors

Course Description: This course is designed to give an in-depth study of geometry with emphasis on methods of proof and the formal language of mathematics. The content will include the following: structure of geometry; separation properties; angle concepts; triangles, quadrilaterals; proofs, perpendicularity and parallelism in a plane and in space; similar polygons; circles and spheres; constructions; area and volume; and coordinate geometry. The Standards for Mathematical Practice apply throughout and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

Social Studies

Economics and Economics Honors

Course Description: This course will provide students with knowledge of the fundamentals of both macro and micro economics in order to promote economic. Content should include, but is not limited to, currency, banking, and monetary policy, the fundamental concepts relevant to the major economic systems, the global market and economy, major economic theories and economists, the roll and influence of the government and fiscal policies, economic measurements, tools, and methodology, financial and investment markets, and the business cycle.

English

English 3 and English 3 Honors

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to provide students, using texts of high complexity, integrated language arts study in reading, writing, speaking, listening, language, and literature in preparation for college and career readiness.

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor. Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted. Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

English 4 and English 4 Honors

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to provide students, using texts of high complexity, integrated language arts study in reading, writing, speaking, listening, language, and literature in preparation for college and career readiness.

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor. Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted. Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

English College Readiness