Course Catalog

Middle

Math

6th Math and 6th Math Advanced/Honors

Course Description: In Grade 6, instructional time should focus on four critical areas: (1) connecting ratio and rate to whole number multiplication and division and using concepts of ratio and rate to solve problems; (2) completing understanding of division of fractions and extending the notion of number to the system of rational numbers, which includes negative numbers; (3) writing, interpreting, and using expressions and equations; and (4) developing understanding of statistical thinking.

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor. Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted. Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

7th Math and 7th Math Advanced

Course Description: In Grade 7,instructional time should focus on four critical area: (1) developing understanding of and applying proportional relationships; (2) developing understanding of operations with rational numbers and working with expressions and linear equations; (3) solving problems involving scale drawings and informal geometric constructions, and working with two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume; and (4) drawing inferences about populations based on samples.

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor. Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted. Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

8th Pre-Algebra

Additional content addressed on the Grade 8 NAEP Mathematics assessment includes:

  • Draw or sketch from a written description polygons, circles, or semicircles.
  • Represent or describe a three-dimensional situation in a two-dimensional drawing from different views.
  • Demonstrate an understanding about the two- and three-dimensional shapes in our world through identifying, drawing, modeling, building, or taking apart.
  • Visualize or describe the cross section of a solid.
  • Represent geometric figures using rectangular coordinates on a plane.
  • Describe how mean, median, mode, range, or interquartile ranges relate to distribution shape.
  • Using appropriate statistical measures, compare two or more data sets describing the same characteristic for two different populations for subset of the same population.
  • Given a sample, identify possible sources of bias in sampling.
  • Distinguish between a random and nonrandom sample.
  • Evaluate the design of an experiment.
  • Determine the theoretical probability of simple and compound events in familiar contexts.
  • Estimate the probability of simple and compound events through experimentation or simulation.
  • Use theoretical probability to evaluate or predict experimental outcomes.
  • Describe relative positions of points and lines using the geometric ideas of midpoint, points on common line through a common point, parallelism, or perpendicularity.
  • Describe the intersection of two or more geometric figures in the plane (e.g., intersection of a circle and a line).
  • Make and test a geometric conjecture about regular polygons.

Science

6th Science and 6th Science Advanced

Course Description: Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the middle school level, all students should have multiple opportunities every week to explore science laboratory investigations (labs). School laboratory investigations are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the middle school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (NRC 2006, p. 77; NSTA, 2007).

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor. Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted. Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

7th Science and 7th Science Advanced

Course Description: Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the middle school level, all students should have multiple opportunities every week to explore science laboratory investigations (labs). School laboratory investigations are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the middle school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (NRC 2006, p. 77; NSTA, 2007).

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor. Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted. Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

8th Science and 8th Science Advanced

Course Description: Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the middle school level, all students should have multiple opportunities every week to explore science laboratory investigations (labs). School laboratory investigations are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the middle school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (NRC 2006, p. 77; NSTA, 2007).

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor. Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted. Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

Social Studies

6th World History and 6th World History Advanced

Course Description: The primary content for this course pertains to the world's earliest civilizations to the ancient and classical civilizations of Africa, Asia, and Europe. Students will be exposed to the multiple dynamics of world history including economics, geography, politics, and religion/philosophy. Students will study methods of historical inquiry and primary and secondary historical documents.

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor. Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted. Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

7th Civics and 7th Civics Advanced

Course Description: The primary content for the course pertains to the principles, functions, and organization of government; the origins of the American political system; the roles, rights, responsibilities of United States citizens; and methods of active participation in our political system. The course is embedded with strong geographic and economic components to support civic education instruction.

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor. Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted. Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

8th US History & Career Planning and 8th US History & Career Planning Advanced

Course Description: Primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of American history from the Exploration and Colonization period to the Reconstruction Period following the Civil War. Students will be exposed to the historical, geographic, political, economic, and sociological events which influenced the development of the United States and the resulting impact on world history. So that students can clearly see the relationship between cause and effect in historical events, students should have the opportunity to explore those fundamental ideas and events which occurred after Reconstruction.

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor. Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted. Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

Electives

M/J Fitness 6

Course Description: This fitness course is designed for 6th grade students and intended to be 18 weeks in length. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and values they need to become healthy and physically active for a lifetime. This course addresses both the health and skill-related components of physical fitness which are critical for students' success.

English

7th ELA and 7th ELA Advanced

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to provide grade 7 students, using texts of appropriate complexity, integrated language arts study in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language for college and career preparation and readiness.

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor. Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted. Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

8th ELA and 8th ELA Advanced

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to provide grade 8 students, using texts of appropriate complexity, integrated language arts study in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language for college and career preparation and readiness.

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor. Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted. Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

 

High

Social Studies

African American History

Course Description: The grade 9-12 African-American History course consists of the following content area strands: World History, American History, Geography, Humanities, Civics and Government. The primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of the chronological development of African Americans by examining the political, economic, social, religious, military and cultural events that affected the cultural group. Content will include, but is not limited to, West African heritage, the Middle Passage and Triangular Trade, the African Diaspora, significant turning points and trends in the development of African American culture and institutions, enslavement and emancipation, the Abolition, Black Nationalist, and Civil Rights movements, major historical figures and events in African-American history, and contemporary African-American affairs.

Science

Agriscience Foundations

Course Description: This course is designed to develop competencies in the areas of agricultural history and the global impact of agriculture; career opportunities; scientific and research concepts; biological and physical science principles; environmental principles; Agriscience safety; principles of leadership; and agribusiness, employability, and human relations skills in Agriscience. Laboratory-based activities are an integral part of this course. These include the safe use and application of appropriate technology, scientific testing and observation equipment.

 

Math

Algebra 1 and Algebra 1 Honors

Course Description: This course is a rigorous in-depth study of the topics of Algebra 1. The purpose of this course is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. The critical areas, called units, deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The Standards for Mathematical Practice apply throughout and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

Algebra 1 Credit Recovery

Note: Credit Recovery courses are credit bearing courses with specific content requirements defined by the Florida Standards. Students enrolled in a Credit Recovery course must have previously attempted the corresponding course (and/or End-of-Course assessment) since the course requirements for the Credit Recovery course are exactly the same as the previously attempted corresponding course. Credit Recovery courses should ONLY be used for credit recovery, grade forgiveness, or remediation for students needing to prepare for an End-of-Course assessment retake. NOTE: This course does not meet NCAA requirements.

Algebra 1B

Course Description: This course is offered only to those students who took Algebra 1a and need Algebra 1b. This course will not be offered SY 21-22. This is the second year of a two-year Algebra 1 sequence. The purpose of this course is to develop the algebraic concepts and processes that can be used to solve a variety of real world and mathematical problems using concrete models to explain algebraic concepts. The content will include: properties of real numbers including rational and irrational numbers; algebraic notation; scientific notation; polynomials; varied means for analyzing and expressing patterns, relations, and functions; linear and quadratic functions; coordinate geometry; geometric relationships; and data analysis concepts. Manipulatives, calculators, and computers will serve as instructional tools in concept development. Algebra 1b meets 1.0 credit for math graduation requirements, but only 0.5 credits for entrance into the state university system or Bright Futures Scholarship Program.

Algebra 2 and Algebra 2 Honors

Course Description: This course is designed for students to build on their work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, students extend their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students work closely with the expressions that define the functions and continue to expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. The Standards for Mathematical Practice apply throughout and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

Analysis of Functions

Course Description: One semester of this course is designed to provide students with a complete study of circular and trigonometric functions and their applications. Problem solving is emphasized throughout. The content will include identities, graphs, inverses of circular functions, particular and general solutions of trigonometric equations, and solutions of right and oblique triangles. The other semester is designed to strengthen and extend the student’s knowledge of functions and mathematical modeling. The content will include various data collection methods, analyzing data sets using statistical techniques, determining probabilities, and the study of function families. Calculators and computers will serve as instructional tools in concept development.

Electives

American Sign Language 1

Major Concepts/Content: American Sign Language 1 introduces students to the target language and its culture. The student will develop communicative skills in all three modes of communication and cross-cultural understanding. Emphasis is placed on proficient communication in the language with introductions to culture, connections, comparisons, and communities.

Note: American Sign Language 1 is not a qualifying world language for Bright Futures. Only American Sign Language 2, 3, and 4 are qualifying world languages under Bright Futures at this time.